"We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."

Our Program

The Project on Constitutional Originalism and the Catholic Intellectual Tradition (CIT) promotes scholarship that explores the relationship between the Catholic intellectual tradition and American constitutionalism. That tradition is deep and rich, including philosophical and theological accounts of law and politics by such figures as St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas. Although CIT’s primary focus is on theories of constitutional law, such as originalism, its ambit is broad and covers the relevance of the Catholic intellectual tradition for constitutional history, doctrine, and other fields of study.

 

CIT will carry out its mission through such activities as guest lectures, conferences, courses offered through the Law School, a program on the Catholic intellectual tradition for young lawyers in the D.C. area (see the "Aquinas Fellowship" on the Fellowship page), and a program of special events and offerings for students at The Catholic University of America (see the "Junior Fellowship" on the Fellowship page). Our goal is for CIT to become the center of scholarly conversation about the relationship between the Catholic intellectual tradition and American constitutionalism and to reach beyond the academy to think tanks, young professionals, and the broader public.

Our Mission

The mission of the Project on Constitutional Originalism and the Catholic Intellectual Tradition is to promote scholarship and educate the legal profession about the relationship between the Catholic intellectual tradition and American constitutionalism.

Our Staff and Faculty Fellows

J. Joel Alicea
Co-Director

Professor J. Joel Alicea’s scholarship focuses on constitutional theory. His scholarship has appeared or will appear soon in the Virginia Law Review, Notre Dame Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, and the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, among other publications. He is also active in public debates about constitutional law, publishing essays in journals such as National Affairs and The Public Discourse. Professor Alicea clerked for Justice Samuel A. Alito, Jr., on the U.S. Supreme Court and Judge Diarmuid F. O'Scannlain on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Princeton University.

Kevin C. Walsh
Co-Director

Professor Kevin C. Walsh teaches and writes in the areas of federal jurisdiction and constitutional law. His scholarship focuses on doctrines that define the scope of federal judicial power, and has appeared in the Stanford Law Review, New York University Law Review, the University of Chicago Law Review, and the Notre Dame Law Review, among other venues. Professor Walsh clerked for Justice Antonin Scalia on the U.S. Supreme Court and for Judge Paul V. Niemeyer on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School, the University of Notre Dame, and Dartmouth College.

Chad Squitieri
Fellow

Professor Chad Squitieri’s scholarship focuses on administrative law and constitutional interpretation. His scholarship has appeared in the Missouri Law Review and the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy. Previously, he served as an associate attorney at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, where he was a member of the Appellate and Constitutional Law and Administrative Law and Regulatory practice groups. He previously served as a Special Assistant to former United States Secretary of Labor Eugene Scalia, and as a law clerk for then-Chief Judge D. Brooks Smith on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. He is a graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law and Florida State University.

Matthew Mangiaracina
Associate Director

Matthew Mangiaracina is the Associate Director for the Project on Constitutional Originalism and the Catholic Intellectual Tradition. He previously worked in marketing and brand advancement for think tanks. He also worked in federal grants for the Assistant Secretary of Community Planning and Development in the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development, and as White House Liaison for the U.S. Department of the Interior. He is a graduate of Florida State University and lives in Hyattsville, Maryland with his wife and three daughters.

Advisory Council of the Project on Constitutional Originalism
and the Catholic Intellectual Tradition

        • Hon. Samuel A. Alito, Jr.U.S. Supreme Court
          Honorary Chair of the Advisory Council
          • J. BudziszewskiProfessor of Government and Philosophy
            The University of Texas at Austin
          • Richard EkinsProfessor of Law and Constitutional Government
            University of Oxford
          • Nicole Stelle GarnettJohn P. Murphy Foundation Professor of Law
            Notre Dame Law School
          • Sherif GirgisAssociate Professor of Law
            Notre Dame Law School
          • Francis Russell HittingerProfessor Emeritus of Catholic Studies, University of Tulsa
            Senior Fellow, Institute for Human Ecology, The Catholic University of America
            Visiting Professor, Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology
          • Maris KöpckeLecturer, Faculty of Law
            University of Barcelona
          • Kurt LashE. Claiborne Robins Distinguished Professor of Law
            University of Richmond School of Law
          • Rev. Dominic Legge, O.P.Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology
            Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception
          • Jeffrey A. PojanowskiProfessor of Law
            Notre Dame Law School
          • Lee J. StrangJohn W. Stoepler Professor of Law & Values
            The University of Toledo College of Law